first-degree relative

The parents, brothers, sisters, or children of an individual.

English dictionary of cancer terms . 2015.

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  • first-degree relative — ► first degree relative a person s parent, sibling, or child. Main Entry: ↑first degree …   English terms dictionary

  • first-degree relative — a person s parent, sibling, or child. → first degree …   English new terms dictionary

  • first-degree relative — a person s parent, sibling, or child …   Useful english dictionary

  • first-degree — ► ADJECTIVE 1) (of burns) affecting only the surface of the skin and causing reddening. 2) Law, chiefly N. Amer. (of crime, especially murder) in the most serious category. ● first degree relative Cf. ↑first degree relative …   English terms dictionary

  • first-degree — adjective 1》 Medicine denoting burns that affect only the surface of the skin and cause reddening. 2》 Law, chiefly N. Amer. denoting the most serious category of a crime, especially murder. Phrases first degree relative a person s parent, sibling …   English new terms dictionary

  • Degree of relationship — is a measurement of kinship, and may generally be measured as either one vertical or horizontal step in a standard family tree. A first degree relative is a family member who shares about 50 percent of their genes with a particular individual in… …   Wikipedia

  • degree — [di grē′] n. [ME degre < OFr degré, degree, step, rank < VL * degradus < degradare: see DEGRADE] 1. any of the successive steps or stages in a process or series 2. a step in the direct line of descent [a cousin in the second degree] 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • degree — de·gree n 1: a step in a direct line of descent or in the line of ascent to a common ancestor 2 a: a measure of the seriousness of a crime see also fifth degree, first degree, f …   Law dictionary

  • degree — degreed, adj. degreeless, adj. /di gree /, n. 1. any of a series of steps or stages, as in a process or course of action; a point in any scale. 2. a stage or point in or as if in progression or retrogression: We followed the degrees of her… …   Universalium

  • degree — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French degré, from Vulgar Latin *degradus, from Latin de + gradus Date: 13th century 1. a step or stage in a process, course, or order of classification < advanced by degrees > 2 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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